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Urban Health Institute Henrietta Lacks Memorial Award

Honoring outstanding partnerships in our community

The Henrietta Lacks Memorial Award was established in honor of former Turner Station resident and Johns Hopkins cancer patient Henrietta Lacks, whose cells helped make ground-breaking advances in medical research. The Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute (UHI) offers this award to recognize, support and promote exceptional programs which have been developed jointly by university members and local community groups.

This $15,000 award highlights the importance of community-university collaborations, recognizes the accomplishments which can be achieved by such partnerships, and continues to support the efforts of the partnership.


The Pythias A. and Virginia I. Jones African American Community Forum on Memory Loss

Winner of the Fifth Annual Henrietta Lacks Memorial Award 2015

Alzheimer's Association logoThe Pythias A. and Virginia I. Jones African-American Community Forum on Memory Loss is an annual, day-long event for families of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, or other illnesses that create memory loss. The Forum provides information on research and clinical trials, support services and other resources to hundreds of families. Read more here


The Men & Families Center

Winner of the Fourth Annual Henrietta Lacks Memorial Award 2014

MFCThe Men and Families Center, Inc. is a family services agency. Their mission is to create safer, more resilient men, women, children and families by supporting them in developing their inner strengths, life skills, parenting skills and networks of resources through holistic approaches that move them towards self-sufficiency and self- empowerment.


Safe Streets East

Winner of the Third Annual Henrietta Lacks Memorial Award 2013

Safe Streets LogoSafe Streets is a community mobilization and outreach program designed to combat shootings and homicides. Safe Streets Baltimore uses a unique, interdisciplinary, public health approach to violence prevention. We maintain that violence is a learned behavior that can be prevented using disease control methods.
Using proven public health techniques, the model aims to prevent violence through a three-prong approach:
1. Identification & detection
2. Interruption, Intervention, & risk reduction
3. Changing behavior and norms

Press release available here


Moveable Feast

Winner of the Second Annual Henrietta Lacks Memorial Award 2012

MoveablefeastlogoMoveable Feast is one of over a dozen established community-university collaborations from across the city nominated for the award. Founded in 1989, Moveable Feast puts nutritious food on the table for people in Maryland with AIDS, breast cancer and other severe illnesses. Moveable Feast was nominated by Hopkins based bike team Fierce Chicks Rock. Fierce Chicks Rock and Moveable Feast have an eight year history of successful collaboration, which has resulted in significant funding for Moveable Feast’s food and nutrition services and a better continuum of care, namely for HIV/AIDS patients transitioning to outpatient care.


Newborn Holistic Ministries!

Winner of the Inaugural Henrietta Lacks Memorial Award 2011

Newborn Holistic MinistriesNewborn Holistic Ministries is one of nearly two dozen established community-university collaborations from across the city nominated for the inaugural Henrietta Lacks Memorial Award. Named in honor of Henrietta Lacks, the $15,000 award recognizes and supports Baltimore community organizations that are collaborating with Johns Hopkins University to improve the health and well-being of the city of Baltimore.

Inaugural Herietta Lacks Memorial Award Winner Honored, October 14 - 20, 2011 issue, The Baltimore Times

An immortal legacy: Hopkins and the community reflect on contributions of Henrietta Lacks at second annual lecture, October 13, Inside Hopkins

Inaugural Henrietta Lacks Memorial Award winner announced Urban Health Institute honors work of Newborn Holistic Ministries, October 10, The JHU Gazette

Newborn Holistic Ministries was founded in 1996 to preserve and enrich life in Baltimore’s Sandtown-Winchester and Upton communities by providing services to enable residents to meet their material, social, and spiritual needs. Newborn has achieved significant revitalization to the 1900 and 2000 blocks of Pennsylvania Avenue while also running Martha’s Place, a program for women overcoming drug addiction and homelessness, and Jubilee Arts, a program that offers arts classes and cultural opportunities as alternatives to violence and drugs. Johns Hopkins collaborates with Newborn through student internships and by providing resident physicians who serve clients of Martha’s Place.



WHO CAN APPLY? Any collaborative program that addresses one or more of the following issues: poverty, community health and well-being, social justice and neighborhood development.

•     Must include at least one community organization and at least one Johns Hopkins faculty or staff member. The team must have worked together on a community-based program for at least three years. 
•     Teams can either apply for themselves or be nominated by others.
•     Those nominated in the past who didn’t receive the award are encouraged to apply again.

This award celebrates cooperative work in our community with an established vision, mission and goals that build upon each other’s strengths.


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