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Media and Publications

The UHI acts as a bridge to the community, conveying information about health and human service resources and also synthesizing and disseminating research findings. As we proceed with our work, the UHI will share what we learn with our neighbors and the nation.

Newsletters

Progress in Community Health Partnerships (UHI's peer-reviewed journal)

Best Practices for Baltimore

Reports on UHI Events and Programs

UHI Symposia (view full-length videos of each event)

UHI Annual Report

Health and Well-Being of Baltimore's Children, Youth and Families


Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action (PCHP)

With funding from the Kellogg Foundation, the UHI created the first scholarly journal dedicated to community-based participatory research. The journal aims to showcase model community partnerships that improve public health, promote progress in educational and research methods in community health, and encourage actions to benefit the health of individuals and communities.

Visit the PCHP website


Best Practices for Baltimore

The Best Practices series brings together the knowledge of the Johns Hopkins Schools of Arts and Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health to deliver best practices for issues that profoundly affect Baltimore. Each brief is developed by an expert at Johns Hopkins University for the Urban Health Institute and reviewed by a panel of peers to ensure accuracy.
The series is intended to be used as a source book for developing best practice programs.

Best Practices for Effective Schools
Full text
Abridged version

Best Practices for Violence Prevention
Full text
Abridged version


Reports on UHI Events and Programs

UHI Self-Study and Independent Review (PDF 10MB)
A synthesis of our work since 2006. The Self-Study describes what we have achieved, issues encountered, and plans for the future.?

Lessons Learned: Creating Successful Community-University Partnerships
A distillation of the valuable lessons learned from a 2007 Community University Partnership Forum that brought together leaders from community groups, Johns Hopkins University, and other Baltimore universities, as well as colleagues from around the country to discuss establishing and maintaining community-university partnerships.

Building a Healthier East Baltimore: The Community-Faith-Hopkins Forums
Summarizes the Community-Faith-Hopkins Forums held in 2007 and 2008. These ongoing forums bring together faith leaders, community based organizations, academic deans, and neighborhood residents for candid discussions about issues affecting East Baltimore.

Building Community Collaborations For Families: What Works?
Communities That Care

Summarizes the Fall 2008 UHI Quarterly Symposium with Richard Catalano, PhD, director of the Social Development Research Group at the University of Washington and co-founder of Communities That Care—a nationally recognized prevention-planning system that promotes the positive development of children and youth and prevents adolescent problem behaviors.

Addressing and Overcoming Health Inequities: The Challenge in Urban America
Summarizes the Winter 2010 UHI Quarterly Symposium with former U.S. Surgeon General, Dr. David Satcher.
Fact Sheet: Health Disparities in Baltimore City: Is Geography Destiny?

Social Determinants of Urban Health:
Findings and Recommendations from the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health

Summarizes the Spring 2010 UHI Quarterly Symposium with Sir Michael Marmot, director of the International Institute for Society and Health and MRC Research Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College in?London.


UHI Symposia

The UHI hosts symposia in partnership with various community organizations. The symposia aim to create discussions and dialogue on critical issues for our community. Each program includes an open forum for the Hopkins and neighborhood communities.

Escaping Melodramas: Reflecting on Medical Research in Tuskegee and Guatemala
UHI Race and Research Symposium: Monday, May 9, 2011
Featuring Susan M. Reverby, PhD, MA, Marion Butler McLean Professor in the History of Ideas, Wellesley College; Author, Examining Tuskegee: The Infamous Syphilis Study and its Legacy. Susan M. Reverby is a medical historian and nationally recognized expert on the Tuskegee syphilis study. Her recently publicized research on an immoral government medical study in Guatemala between 1946 and 1948 where men and women were given syphilis led to an apology from President Obama to President Colom of Guatemala.

Overcoming Adversity: Resilience in Children
UHI Symposium: Thursday, April 28, 2011
Featuring Sir Michael Rutter, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. Sir Michael Rutter is among the best known resilience researchers in the world. His work has shown that a child’s resilience is not just dependent on the child’s temperament, IQ or genes, but on the child’s interactions with others and whether those others successfully support a child’s growth and development.

Going Beyond Race: The Impact of Racism on Health
UHI Race and Research Symposium: Tuesday, March 8, 2011
Featuring Dr. Camara Jones. Dr. Jones is a national leader and CDC epidemiologist whose work focuses on the impact of racism on the health and well-being of the nation. She seeks to broaden the national health debate to include social determinants of health—including poverty—and the social determinants of equity, including racism. Her allegories on race and racism illuminate topics that are otherwise difficult for many Americans to understand or discuss.

The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates
UHI Symposium with author Wes Moore: Thursday, October 21, 2010
Two kids with the same name, living in Baltimore. One grew up to be a Rhodes Scholar, decorated combat veteran, White House Fellow, and business leader. The other is serving a life sentence in prison for felony murder. In The Other Wes Moore, author Wes Moore tells the true story of a generation of boys trying to find their way in a challenging and at times, hostile world.

Social Determinants of Urban Health: Findings and Recommendations from the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health
UHI Symposium: Wednesday, April 14, 2010
Featuring Sir Michael Marmot, director of the International Institute for Society and Health and MRC Research Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College in London. For the past 30 years , Sir Marmot has led a research group based in London. In 2000 he was knighted by Her Majesty The Queen for services to Epidemiology and understanding health inequalities.

The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease
UHI Race and Research Series; Tuesday, April 6, 2010
Jonathan Metzl, MD, PhD, psychiatrist, author, and associate professor of Psychiatry and Women's Studies at the University of Michigan talks about his book, The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease, which shows how associations between schizophrenia and blackness emerged during the 1960s and 1970s in ways that directly reflected national political events.

Addressing and Overcoming Health Disparities: The Challenge in Urban America
UHI Symposium; Wednesday, January 27, 2010
Dr. David Satcher, former US Surgeon General and director of the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine, outlines several focus areas to begin the work of eliminating disparities in health, including access to care, improvement in the quality of care, lifestyle enhancement, improvement of environmental quality, and a balanced research agenda.

Building Community Collaborations For Families: What Works?
Communities That Care

UHI Symposium; Thursday, October 8, 2009
Richard Catalano, PhD, director of the Social Development Research Group at the University of Washington and co-founder of Communities That Care?a nationally recognized prevention-planning system that promotes the positive development of children and youth and prevents adolescent problem behaviors?leads a discussion about his work this landmark program.

The Historical and Cultural Context of HIV Prevention: Knowing Where You've Been Before Knowing Where You Need To Go
UHI Race and Research Series; Wednesday, April 1, 2009
Dr. Gail Wyatt, professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA and an associate director of the UCLA AIDS Institute, describes a model for sexual health based on the cultural context of sexuality and how such a perspective can help to explain racial health disparities and frame strategies to prevent HIV in African Americans.

American Apartheid: Race, Fact and Myth in US Medical Research
UHI Race and Research Series; Monday, February 2, 2009
Harriet Washington, bioethics journalist and author of the award-winning book, Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present chronicles her extraordinary exploration into the history of medical experimentation in Black America and discusses origins of racial health disparities.

Redesigning East Baltimore
UHI Symposium; Wednesday, November 12, 2008
Leaders of redevelopment efforts, residents, elected officials, and members of the Johns Hopkins community discuss the redevelopment efforts currently underway in East Baltimore.


UHI Annual Report

2011-2012 UHI Annual Report

Annual Report Appendices

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