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Partnerships for Health

Community Education, Awareness, and Support to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening

Strategic Plan to Reduce Teen Births in Baltimore City

Faith-Based Youth Workers' Influence on Adolescent Sexual Health

Early Child Development Initiative for East Baltimore

The Access Partnership (TAP)


Community Education, Awareness, and Support to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening

The UHI is focused on reducing the racial disparities of colorectal cancer screening among African Americans age 50 to 75 in East Baltimore.  Based on our previous study on promoters and barriers to screening, we developed and implemented interventions to address the barriers.  

Strategies included conducting both individual and community outreach and education to positively impact knowledge and attitudes about colorectal cancer and colonoscopy screening. Specific attention and priority was given to hard-to-reach populations through partnerships we developed with agencies such as Sisters Together and Reaching, Recovery Network, Living Classrooms Re-Entry Program, Oliver Community Center, half-way houses, and housing developments.  In partnership with Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, we developed and implemented a motivational interviewing strategy for individual and group sessions.  We conducted presentations to health care providers including JHU's Cancer Center's Noon Seminar, National Medical Association Conference, and Partnering with Patients in Decision Making Conference.  

We also developed a community-based awareness media campaign around colonoscopy screening in East Baltimore to promote scheduling and completion of colorectal cancer screening. 

View the posters here.
View the video PSAs here.

Funding for the study was provided by Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, the Cigarette Restitution Fund Research Grant at Johns Hopkins, and the Urban Health Institute.

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Strategic Plan to Reduce Teen Births in Baltimore City

Led by Healthy Teen Network, the UHI and the and Johns Hopkins Center for Adolescent Health served as major partners in the planning and execution of an initiative to reduce teen births in the city. The new plan intends to reduce the birth rate by giving teens more and better access to sex education, improving the availability of services, targeting groups that are most at-risk, and engaging a wide-range of community leaders to sustain the initiative.

Download the Executive Summary.

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Faith-Based Youth Workers' Influence on Adolescent Sexual Health

In collaboration with Sisters Together and Reaching (STAR), the UHI has been awarded a grant to explore the influence on adolescents of youth ministers within African American churches located in low income, urban communities with disproportionately high rates of teen pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, and STD infections. This study will contribute to the development of more effective sexual and reproductive health promoting strategies engaging those within the faith community who most directly work with young people. Learn more about the study.

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Early Child Development Initiative for East Baltimore

With funding from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation , the UHI, in collaboration with the Maryland Family Network and the Johns Hopkins Department of Pediatrics, is working to establish integrated systems of family supports and health services related to early child development. The Inititaive includes development of an early childhood facility in East Baltimore by fall 2011.

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The Access Partnership (TAP)

Launched in 2009 as a pilot program in two East Baltimore zip codes, the Access Partnership (TAP) provides free specialty-care access to uninsured patients who live in the neighborhoods around The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Bayview Medical Center in coordination with their dedicated primary care clinicians. TAP proved so successful it was expanded to include patients from five additional zip codes, bringing the total to seven: 21202, 21205, 21213, 21219, 21222, 21224, and 21231. The program is the first of its kind in Baltimore.

To qualify patients must:

  • Live within the seven target zip codes: 21202, 21205, 21213, 21219, 21222, 21224, and 21231
  • Have a Johns Hopkins primary care provider
  • Be uninsured or underinsured due to low-income.

The UHI participated in the planning of TAP and has supported the first phase of the TAP evaluation which is designed to determine whether the program achieves its goals to improve patients’ access to care and to assess TAP’s impact and sustainability in light of healthcare reform. The interim report has found TAP helps to increase uninsured patients’ access to specialty care, improve their knowledge and satisfaction of health care system, and decrease ER use.

For more information about TAP, contact Anne Langley -443-997-0727 
or Desiree De La Torre -443-991-0728

TAP in the news:

6/30/13 Quarterly Report 

"Does Access to Comprehensive Outpatient Care Alter Patterns of Emergency Department Utilization Among Uninsured Patients in East Baltimore?"Journal of Primary Care & Community Health February 20, 2013 

Johns Hopkins Provides Free Specialty Care for the Uninsured in East Baltimore, UHI Newsletter, Winter 2011, Issue 12

Expanding The Boundaries, Hopkins Medicine, Winter 2010

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